I have been a fan of Robert Marzano’s work since I read Classroom Instruction that Works  several years ago.  He broke down what teachers could do into doable “chunks” with research to prove that it works.  I have designed staff development around this model for years and incorporated my CRISS trainings to include this research.  So image my excitement when I discovered this wiki : Web 2.0 That Works!

According to Marzano’s research there are 9 Key areas for Classroom Instruction to focus on:

  • Identifying Similarities and Differences
  • Cooperative Learning
  • Summarizing and Note-Taking
  • Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition
  • Homework and Practice
  • Non-linguistic Representation
  • Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback
  • Generating and Testing Hypotheses
  • Questions, Cues and Advance Organizers

The wiki gives the basic info about each area, lists tools that address that area and gives examples of these tools being used by teachers and students.  The difference between this and a regular web page is that a web page is static for the most part with one “expert” author, this allows any of us to add in new tools and to share our examples with other educators.  This is also a great place to check out some web 2.0 tools that you have not heard about before.

So what categories does blogging fit in?  Identifying Similarities and Differences, Cooperative Learning, Summarizing and Note-Taking, Homework and Practice, Generating and Testing Hypotheses, Questions, Cues and Advance Organizers

What other topics in education could you see wikis being used to help collaboration?  Do you see a benefit of having multiple authors on resource?  Do you trust the information?

Edited to add in this resource: http://gets.gc.k12.va.us/VSTE/2008/ – “Many teachers are asking how technology can be integrated with these strategies to improve student learning.  Click on the links (each bar of the graph below) to review those strategies and see examples and templates to support technology integration.”