Archive for category tutorial

Tech Thursday – March 29th

I know it has been a little bit between posts, but with Google Apps testing and a wicked allergy season blogging moved to the end of my to do list.

Anyway – today I am looking at easy ways to create screencasts for your students.  Screencasts make excellent reviews or tutorials for students to access at home or on their on in class.  This is also an essential tool if you ever think about flipping your classroom.

Screenr – http://www.screenr.com/ – Is a free service that is a web-based recorder.  You can record your voice as the screen is recorded to create up to a 5 minute video.  The size of the screen to be recorded can also be customized.  The screencasts can be shared via link or by embedding them on a webpage with the provided embed code.

ScreenCast-O-Matic – http://www.screencast-o-matic.com/ – Allows for up to 15 minute videos and also allows the recorder to pause the screen and  highlight the mouse.  The video can be downloaded in a variety of formats and then can be loaded into Youtube so it can be embedded on your webpage.

ScreenCastle – http://screencastle.com – Click the record button and set the size of your screen before you begin recording.  After recording the video is uploaded to their website and you are provided links to use or an embed code.  Free and easy to use, although a little basic for me.

Jing – http://www.techsmith.com/jing.html?gclid=CKrqiuyhjK8CFUpjTAodRAHbFg – this is a great resource to create 5 minute videos based on what is happening on your screen and your voiceover.  The user can determine what part of the screen they want to capture in either screen shots or video.  Once done the video is in flash format and will need to be converted before loaded into Youtube.   This does require a download, but the software is free.

 

I must say I am partial to Jing as I have the most experience with it, but it does require a download and frequent updates which can be a pain if you don’t have that type of access to your computer.   What is your favorite?

Tags: , , ,

Idea #4 – Concept Mapping with Inspiration

Want to increase brain activity in your students,  encourage active comprehension and step-up dynamic discussions in the classroom?  It all can be done with one simple activity of concept mapping.

Today’s idea uses  the software Inspiration 8 (installed on all teacher machines on campus) and your projector.  The document camera can also be incorporated as student’s share the maps they have created.



Why use Inspiration?

  1. It’s easy and already loaded on all teacher machines on campus.
  2. Inspiration provides pre-made templates to get the concept map going for the big screen (choose New – From Template to see the options)
  3. Keeps the map organized and easy to read for the class.
  4. Circles can be changed to clip art for more of a visual impact.
  5. Brainstorming is easy with the lightening bolt icon.
  6. Maps and ideas can be easily rearranged without starting over.
  7. Finished products can be saved as Word files and placed online for those who missed the class.

Ideas on How to Use Concept Mapping in the Classroom:

As a reading strategy:

1. Pre-reading:  have students brainstorm what they know about the items listed on the skelton concept map.  Add those ideas in and have students record on their own papers.

2. During Reading – Students then read the assigned passage and add in more details as they learn them.

3. Post reading – Compare maps with the class and add in details students might have missed.  (Use the document camera to show student’s original maps.)

Extension:

    • Sub-topics can be recorded on note-cards and students can add in more details about that topic as they read/learn more
    • Cards can then be turned into a paragraphs within a research paper.
    • Each sub-topic could become a research topic for the class.

As a note-taking strategy:

  1. Give students a partially filled concept map and have them add to it as you discuss, research, etc. the topic given.
  2. Have students create their own map of the story/event with main characters/main events in ech sub-circle and details surrounding from there.

Getting Started:

Download a how-to guide for Inspiration 8:  How to Use Inspiration 8

Watch a quick tutorial on the software here:

Documentation and research on using concept mapping in the classroom is based from “Classroom Instruction that Works” by Robert Marzano and Project Criss.

Tags: , , , , ,

Idea #1 – Teach Students How to Read the Textbook

With the addition of document cameras and ceiling mounted projectors in the classroom, the challenge is learning to use this new technology to it’s fullest.   This is the first in a series to offer teachers ideas:

Idea #1:  Teach Students How to Read the Textbook

Students do not automatically know how to read any given  textbook.  Each book is different with it’s own structure and style.  Using a document camera and a projector, teachers can teach students to analyze the structure of their textbooks so that they can better comprehend what they are reading.

Students who have more knowledge of text structure learn more from expository material that students who are not aware of text structure.

The document camera makes it easy by allowing the teacher to project the textbook onto the screen for all to see, instead of having to hold up the book and hope students are looking at the same place they are.

The video walks you through the basics of teaching students to evaluate the structure of a textbook and to identify the resources provided.

For more information on teaching students how to read a textbook see:

Tags: , , , , , ,

YouTube Video Tools for Teachers

Here are a few video tools for YouTube  all teachers should know about:

YouTube – http://www.youtube.com/

TubeChop http://www.tubechop.com/ – Ever had a video on Youtube that you only wanted to show part of?  This website helps with that.

  1. Find a YouTube Video you want to clip
  2. Copy the URL – and go to http://www.tubechop.com/
  3. Paste in the url into the provided box on the webpage
  4. Select video and choose “Chop It.”
  5. Choose the portion of the video you want to keep by dragging the markers on the beginning and end of the clip and click on “Chop It”
  6. The website then provide you with a link to your chopped video as well as an embed code to place that clip on a webpage.

Kick You Tube – – Download YouTube videos for future use.       You have options on what format you want to save the video and downloaded videos can be stored on Thumb drives or DVD’s for access when the network is down or you don’t want to rely on streaming.  Basically you type in the work “kick” in the url before”youtube” and follow the instructions.

A great tutorial on how to do this can be found at Tammy Worcester Tip of the Week.

YouTube to Mp3 Converter – http://www.video2mp3.net/ – convert video clips into mp3 clips.  Good when looking for sound bites for instruction.

Tags: , ,

Turning Points 2008 – Getting Started

Something I wish I had when I was teaching was a way to get instant feedback from students to see if they were “getting” what I was teaching, besides the look on their faces.  It would have been nice to know where I needed to stop and reexplain before the test came around.  New technology allows that to happen.  Student Response System translate those stares into answers.

 Student Response Systems are very useful in getting instant feedback about what students know and don’t know.  You can reteach concepts right then and there instead of waiting until the papers have been graded and analyzing the results.

Turning Points 2008 is a student response system that partners with PowerPoint in creating interactive slides.  So if you know PowerPoint, getting started with Turning Points is a relatively smooth transition.

I have created 3 video tutorials on the program, as well as a 2 page quick start guide for those who would like to get started or need a refreshers with the new upgrade.

Turning Points 2008 Quick Start Guide – word document

Turning Points – Part 1 – Setting Up a Template – Step one in getting set-up correctly is creating the template for your presentation. 

Turning Points – Part 2 – Creating Question Slides – Turning Points gives you various chart options and has some pre-made slides to choose from.

Turning Points – Part 3 – Users Lists and Session Data – Users lists let the program know who responded which answer to each question. 

Tags: , , ,